How To Find An Apartment In Frisco, Texas

How To Find An Apartment In Frisco, Texas

One of the great things about moving to Frisco, Texas is how affordable it is. You can live there for an affordable price and the groceries and utilities are very reasonable as well. If you want to enjoy a high quality of life in an affordable city, the you should consider renting an apartment in Frisco.

Renting an apartment is much easier than buying a house and it is much cheaper. If you are planning to stay in Frisco for more than five years then you might want to consider buying a house because the home prices are cheap and you can find something amazing for a great price. There are lots of homes to choose from and you won’t have to pay much for them and if you choose well then the price can even be cheaper than renting an apartment.

You are going to need to have a budget figured out when you start looking at apartments. The lower your budget is the easier it is going to be to save money. You can find apartments in many price ranges and you can find everything from high end luxury apartments to ultra cheap budget apartments. The apartment you decide to rent will depend on how much you want to spend on it.

Frisco is an affordable place to live and you can find apartments in just about any neighborhood. You are going to want to spend some time checking out the different neighborhoods to see where you want to live. Make sure the amenities and shopping you enjoy are close and make sure the neighborhood is a good once since not every neighborhood is going to be totally safe. If you do your research you can find a great apartment in any price range.

‘$5b Mile’ in Frisco, Tx Lands New Apartment Project

‘$5b Mile’ in Frisco, Tx Lands New Apartment Project

Dive Brief:
JPI, an Irving, TX, developer has announced plans to build a 440-unit apartment complex in the $700 million Gate development along the “$5 billion mile” in Frisco, TX, according to The Dallas Morning News. The units will be divided between two buildings, both five stories high, and construction is expected to begin next year. Frisco’s “$5 billion mile” is a reference to the mixed-use projects springing up along one stretch of road in the former dove-hunting hub. City officials estimate there is an additional $2 billion of development throughout the rest of Frisco.
Dive Insight:

In May, Frisco officials gave their first approvals for a 17-story, luxury residential high-rise for the Dallas Cowboys’ $1.5 billion Star in Frisco complex. The mixed-use project will offer up to 160 rental apartments, each one 1,200 square feet and aimed at drawing in empty nesters and those affiliated with the Cowboys. The Star in Frisco already features a 12,000-seat performance venue, office building, hotel, medical center and other amenities, but this will be the project’s first residential building.

Developers of Frisco Station, another $1.5 billion mixed-use project in the Dallas suburb, are also building a residential tower, a 24-story “urban living” high-rise, which will add to the existing planned stock of homes there. In fact, additional apartment construction is also underway. The first project in Frisco Station, a 228,000-square-foot office tower, is now in progress with a 300,000-square-foot retail and entertainment complex and a 40-acre medical complex to follow.

In April, NewcrestImage started construction on two hotel projects in Frisco Station, two Marriott properties that will provide a total of 300 rooms. The builder also has plans to construct a Canopy by Hilton hotel there as well, although that project will accompany a future phase.

Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones is also heading up another development not too far from Frisco in Prosper, TX. Jones and developers for the 500-acre, $1 billion Gates of Prosper project have started construction on a 93-acre shopping center, which is the first phase of the project. Developers are on a 20-year schedule, and, when complete, the Gates of Prosper will offer residential, office and retail space.

Source Article

Texas Will Be a Big Change for Us

I am a single mom and it has been difficult trying to raise four children on my own. The fact that I live in Chicago makes it harder than ever, especially since I don’t live in a very good part of the city. Every day I have to worry about whether my sons are going to come home when they leave the house. I also wonder about my daughters being lost to the streets.

As a result, I have decided to take my aunt up on her offer and relocate to Texas. She told me about a home she inherited that is not being lived in and she believes that it would be perfect for us. The idea of living in Texas is a little exciting, but at the same time, there will need to be some time for adjustments. I know that there is no way that this entire process will be easy and totally seamless.

The other day I started looking around at the schools in the area to see where I should enroll the children. It seems like the schools that are available in Frisco are just as good as the schools in Chicago, if not better. I always though they would be pretty far behind. I guess that is what I get for making assumptions about an entire region of the country.

My children are trying to convince me that staying in the Chicago area would be in our best interest, but I am ready to get a fresh start someplace else. I am going to miss all of the people I have met through all of my years living here, but I cannot focus on that. My main concern is finding a safe and stable home for my little ones.

Jerry Jones, Roger Staubach Announce 17-Story Apartment Complex at the Star in Frisco

Jerry Jones, Roger Staubach Announce 17-Story Apartment Complex at the Star in Frisco

FRISCO, TEXAS — A joint venture between Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, former Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach and Dallas developer Robert Shaw has announced plans for a 17-story apartment complex within The Star in Frisco. The property will feature 160 units with an average size of 1,200 square feet per unit. Construction is scheduled to begin in January 2018, with move-ins scheduled for the first quarter of 2019. Columbus Realty will develop the project.

Source Article

Finding the Best Frisco Apartments

Finding the Best Frisco Apartments

If you are on the lookout to move to an apartment, you are going to want to take measures to find the best one. There are a lot of Frisco apartments available that you can choose from. Below, we will be going over some of the top factors to consider when it comes to finding the best Frisco apartments.

Finding The Best Frisco Apartments:

1. Location.

One of the main factors that you are going to want to look at when you are trying to find the best Frisco apartments is the location of the apartment. Ideally, you want to try to find the apartment that is located in the best possible spot for you to be able to live comfortably. Whether that means getting an apartment that is located close to your workplace or your children’s school. This is a major factor that has to be considered whenever you are in the process of selecting a new apartment.

2. Price.

Another thing that you are going to want to carefully look at and consider is the price of the apartment. You want to make sure that you are able to find the right apartment that fits within your specific budget. That way, you know that you can comfortably afford it. This is going to be critical to ensuring that you find a place that is actually going to work for you and your family.

3. Schooling.

If you currently have or are planning on starting a family anytime soon, you will want to make sure that you are looking at all of the schooling options surrounding the area. By doing this, you will be able to see whether or not the area is going to be suitable for raising a family.

By looking at and considering all of the factors above, you should be able to make a good decision regarding which apartment to choose.

Frisco Apartments Hinge on Land Rights, Zoning

Frisco Apartments Hinge on Land Rights, Zoning

The issue of apartments and density has been a hot topic this election season in Frisco. While campaigning, a majority of Frisco City Council candidates stated that controlling the number of apartments would be one of their top priorities if elected.

Frisco has 11,949 existing urban living and garden-style apartment units, 3,663 units under construction and another 7,248 units in the pipeline.

Residents have expressed opposition to apartment projects in the city because of an increase in traffic, among other reasons—opposition city officials say they understand but in some cases do not have the legal authority to address.

According to city and development law officials, the city is bound to approve certain multifamily projects because of the zoning process and property rights. Although the city has taken steps to control the amount of land
zoned for apartments, it does not have the ability to regulate some land that is already zoned for multifamily.

“This issue of high density has been around for five years, and the concern is the multifamily growth in Frisco is majorly impacting the community and the infrastructure,” Frisco Mayor Pro Tem Will Sowell said.

However, city officials say multifamily living does have a place in Frisco, and that place is in mixed-use developments along major transportation corridors. In this respect, Frisco is following a trend found across the country, city Director of Development Services John Lettelleir said.

Sowell said it is the responsibility of Frisco’s elected officials to ensure that residents understand the zoning process.

“It’s an obligation we have to also balance the needs of land owners and their rights, and what the residents want for the future of the city,” he said.

Lettelleir said the city has taken significant strides throughout the years to reduce the number of multifamily units in Frisco.

“When Frisco was starting to grow, there was not a professional staff in place such as a city planner or even an engineer to thoroughly evaluate zoning requests,” Lettelleir said. “So land tended to get overzoned for certain land uses, and this happens in all communities.”

Between 1999 and 2000, with the zoning that had been in place for the past 34 years, the city had potential for 65,000 garden-style units, Lettelleir said.

Garden-style apartments generally take up more land because they incorporate surface parking rather than structured parking, may have multiple buildings and also have bigger units than urban-style apartments. An urban-style development is one building constructed around a parking garage and generally has smaller units than a garden-style apartment complex.

The city made single-family home developments a priority to bring down the amount of land zoned for apartment buildings, Lettelleir said. City officials initiated a zoning change to alter some of the multifamily zoning to designated single-family zoning and asked the staff to increase the development standards in the comprehensive plan to help reduce the number of apartments, Lettelleir said. Now zoning is in place for only 26,000-27,000 garden-style apartment units.

Landowner rights

Frisco has two types of zoning approvals: nondiscretionary and discretionary.

Nondiscretionary zoning approvals take place when zoning is already in place on a piece of property for what the landowner or developer wants to build.

“For instance, if that zoning allows apartments, then there is no discretion in the city’s ability to say yes or no to that use,” said Tommy Mann, a Dallas attorney who specializes in zoning and land use law.

In nondiscretionary zoning cases, the city has an obligation to approve the project. If a nondiscretionary zoning case is not approved, a developer could sue the city for damages, Mann said.

Mann said it could be confusing to residents when the planning and zoning commission approves a site plan for an apartment project. In the city of Frisco, the planning and zoning commission has final authority on site plans if the project is zoned for that area and meets minimum development standards.

“If it is only a site plan, there is no discretion to deny [a project] just because it is a use that people have objections to,” Mann said.

The second type of zoning approval is discretionary zoning, which occurs when the correct zoning is not in place for the type of project the developer wants to build.

In a discretionary zoning case, the developer is required to apply for a zoning change. If planning and zoning commissioners, city council members or residents have reasonable objections to the change, the council has the authority to deny the zoning change request, Mann said.

Zoning guidelines

Based on the city’s comprehensive plan, which was updated in 2015, a land use strategy was designed to guide leaders to make decisions regarding the community land use pattern.

In the city’s comprehensive plan is a component called the Future Land Use Plan. This is a policy document designed to guide decision-making related to rezoning proposals and for determining the appropriateness of a particular land use at a specific location in the community.

However, the comprehensive plan is not a binding document. According to Chapter 212 of the Texas Local Government code, the comprehensive plan does not override zoning already in place or establish zoning boundaries.

Lettelleir said a property owner may choose to develop a project if the zoning is in place for it regardless of what use the Future Land Use Plan shows; however, if a property owner makes an application for rezoning, the comprehensive plan should be an important consideration in the city’s approval or denial of the request.

“Just because the future land use plan might say urban living, mixed-use [or multifamily] does not guarantee that zoning is going to be approved,” Lettelleir said.

Lettelleir said when a zoning change is requested, the city staff goes through a thorough process to recommend approval or denial to the planning and zoning commission and the city council. But it ultimately comes down to the city council to make a final determination on the request.

Apartment impact

One of the major effects residents believe multifamily housing can have on the community is an increase in traffic, Sowell said. However, he does not think apartments are the cause of crowded roadways.

“The reason traffic is so bad in Frisco is because people are generally leaving Frisco to go somewhere else for their job,” Sowell said. “Then you have those that live in Prosper and Celina that travel through Frisco. So the only way we are going to truly impact traffic in Frisco during rush hour is to bring the job centers to Frisco, and that’s what we want to do with the $5 Billion Mile.”

Sowell said the city should consider zoning changes along the Dallas North Tollway and US 380 that would allow multifamily components within mixed-use developments.

Lettelleir said another common misconception is that an influx of apartments will cause overcrowding problems in Frisco ISD. Urban living-style apartments are becoming more popular in Frisco as mixed-use developments increase, particularly along major transportation corridors. He said because urban-style units are not geared toward families but rather single adults, young couples and senior citizens, an increase in that type of multifamily unit should not substantially increase the number of children in the district.

Todd Fouche, FISD deputy superintendent for business services, said the district is not concerned about multifamily developments increasing the student population. He said even garden-style units are not expected to bring in more students because developments are new and more expensive. However, in 15-20 years he said those same units could be less expensive and could bring in more students.

“From what demographers tell us and what the city has shared with us, urban living developments don’t yield many students, so it’s not something we have a strong concern about,” Fouche said. “And if they do yield more students, our job is educate those students.”

Source Article

Here’s Why Frisco City Officials Can’t Turn down Some Apartment Projects

Here’s Why Frisco City Officials Can’t Turn down Some Apartment Projects

The issue of apartments and density has been a hot topic this election season in Frisco. While campaigning, a majority of Frisco City Council candidates stated that controlling the number of apartments would be one of their top priorities if elected.

Residents have expressed opposition to apartment projects in the city because of an increase in traffic, among other reasons—opposition city officials say they understand but in some cases do not have the legal authority to address.

According to city and development law officials, the city is bound to approve certain multifamily projects because of the zoning process and property rights. Although the city has taken steps to control the amount of land zoned for apartments, it does not have the ability to regulate some land that is already zoned for multifamily.

Frisco has two types of zoning approvals: nondiscretionary and discretionary.

Nondiscretionary zoning approvals take place when zoning is already in place on a piece of property for what the landowner or developer wants to build.

In nondiscretionary zoning cases, the city has an obligation to approve the project. If a nondiscretionary zoning case is not approved, a lawsuit could be brought forth against the city, said Tommy Mann, a Dallas attorney who specializes in zoning and land use law.

Mann said it could be confusing to residents when the planning and zoning commission approves a site plan for an apartment project. In the city of Frisco, the planning and zoning commission has final authority on site plans if the project is zoned for that area and meets minimum development standards.

“If it is only a site plan, there is no discretion to deny [a project] just because it is a use that people have objections to,” Mann said.

The second type of zoning approval is discretionary zoning, which occurs when the correct zoning is not in place for the type of project the developer wants to build.

In a discretionary zoning case, the developer is required to apply for a zoning change. If planning and zoning commissioners, city council members or residents have reasonable objections to the change, the council has the authority to deny the zoning change request, Mann said.

Frisco Mayor Pro Tem Will Sowell said it is the responsibility of Frisco’s elected officials to ensure that residents understand the zoning process.

“It’s an obligation we have to also balance the needs of land owners and their rights, and what the residents want for the future of the city,” he said.

View an expanded version of this story in Community Impact Newspaper’s May issue, publishing in mid-May.

Collin Residents Angry over Forced Annexation into Frisco

Collin Residents Angry over Forced Annexation into Frisco

FRISCO — Frisco’s newest citizens didn’t want any part of city life.

For months, more than two dozen residents along Plum Lane begged and pleaded with city officials to leave their neighborhood alone. They cherished the lack of regulations and the absence of city tax payments that come with county living.

But with one swift vote on Tuesday night, the city council approved the involuntary annexation of their neighborhood, instantly making them Frisco residents and simultaneously gaining control over nearby commercial development.

“We have zero rights and zero say in this,” said John Ross, who’s lived in the unincorporated area for more than 27 years.

The 78 acres surrounded by the cities of McKinney and Frisco has been in Frisco’s extraterritorial jurisdiction, or ETJ, for years. And for a long time, the city was content to keep it that way.

Neighbors, many of whom have lived there for decades, banded together to help each other out over the years. Living outside city limits allowed them to put up outbuildings and sheds at will. Several operate businesses from home. They have septic systems and their own water supply. They contract for their own trash pickup.

But the area is showing its age. The private road is pocked with holes. Fire hydrants are painted black to signal inadequate water flow for firefighting.

A fire hydrant in the newly annexed neighborhood along Plum Lane is painted black to signal that it has inadequate water flow for firefighting.

A few years ago, a storage business was built with county permits that didn’t consider the city’s future plans to widen Westridge Boulevard beyond two lanes. The city took notice.

Last year, construction started on a 132-unit apartment complex with county permits, again renewing the city’s interest. The units are being built along Westridge Boulevard north of the Plum Lane neighborhood.

Developers ADC West Ridge LLP and the Center for Housing Resources Inc. filed a complaint against the city of Frisco over water and sewer service to the project. They say the city is unlawfully denying utility service. Frisco has said the developers must follow the city’s process by submitting plans and installing certain infrastructure themselves. The dispute is pending with the Public Utility Commission of Texas.

Caught in the middle

In January city officials initiated the involuntary annexation process to “bring some order to the development” in its extraterritorial jurisdiction. The Plum Lane area got caught in the middle.

City officials hired consultant Buddy Minett in hopes of reaching a compromise that accomplished the city’s goals without harming the residents, many of whom said they couldn’t afford the extra property taxes from the city. The proposal called for property owners to conform to city regulations and grant utility easements. It also delayed formal annexation and city tax payments for 10 years.

But the deal required participation from everyone.

“Some property owners had legitimate issues,” said Minett, who served on the city council in the late 1990s when Frisco first considered annexing the area but opted against it. “We should have done it then.”

Without 100 percent participation in the compromise, the city moved ahead Tuesday with involuntary annexation.

Tim Legat asked the Frisco City Council on Tuesday for more time to try to get property owners to agree to the city’s compromise. Without 100 percent participation, the council approved the involuntary annexation.

“I feel let down,” Tim Legat said after the vote. He bought his home on Plum Lane in 2003 and has been an outspoken opponent to the city’s takeover.

Not wanted

The annexation means city police and fire service will now respond to calls in the area. But Frisco has no plans to upgrade utilities or improve the road.

Ross said a lot of his neighbors are upset.

“They don’t want us,” he said of the city. “We’re more work for them than they want. The only reason they’re taking us is to control the businesses to the north of us.”

Legat believes the state legislature needs to take a broader look at the law, which gives property owners no say in the fate of their land.

“It’s one of the few laws that allows government to take a heavy hand with the power to annex,” he said. “No matter what we say, we do not have a vote.”

This is the area that was annexed into the city of Frisco. Tract 1 contains the residential homes along Plum Lane. Tract 4 is where the apartment complex is being built.

2 New Residential High-Rises Proposed for ‘$5b Mile’ in Frisco, Tx

2 New Residential High-Rises Proposed for ‘$5b Mile’ in Frisco, Tx

Dive Brief:
Developers for two major Frisco, TX, projects have announced plans to add residential high-rises, according to The Dallas Morning News. Officials with the Dallas Cowboys’ Star in Frisco have proposed a 17-story apartment tower, and Frisco Station developers said they will build a 24-story “urban living” high-rise. Both developers have requested zoning changes necessary to accommodate the projects. Frisco Station already had plans for 2,400 residential units as part of the $1.5 development. This would be the first residential project for the 91-acre Star in Frisco mixed-use campus.
Dive Insight:

Both Star in Frisco and Frisco Station are part of an estimated $5 billion worth of development either completed, in progress or in the planning stages in the city of Frisco.

This month, crews started construction on Frisco Station’s first hotel projects, two Marriott properties that will offer a total of 300 rooms. NewcrestImage, which is building the hotels, also has a Canopy by Hilton in the pipeline for a future phase. In December, construction also kicked off on the first apartments planned for the development. There was no word on whether the high-rise units are part of the 2,400 total or will be in addition to the residential units already planned.

In October 2016, crews also began building the first project in the Frisco Station development, a 228,000-square-foot, seven-story office building across the street from the Star in Frisco property. When Frisco Station is completely built out, it will also feature a 40-acre medical complex and 300,000 square feet of retail, dining and entertainment space, commonly referred to as The Hub.

Not too far from Frisco is another North Texas town that has also seen a surge in new development — Prosper, TX. Construction on the 500-acre, $1 billion Gates of Prosper mixed-use project is underway with its first phase, a 93-acre shopping center. When complete with its 20-year plan, the Gates of Prosper will also feature residential, office and retail space.

Two High-Rise Residential Projects on the Boards for Frisco’s Star and Station Projects

Two High-Rise Residential Projects on the Boards for Frisco’s Star and Station Projects

North Texas’ high-rise housing boom is spreading.

Last week developers broke ground on a 25-story condominium tower in downtown Dallas’ Arts District.

And this week, construction kicks off on a 29-story apartment tower in Plano’s $3 billion Legacy West project.

Now two high-profile Frisco mixed-use developments are planning for their own residential towers.

The Dallas Cowboy’s Star in Frisco project and the Frisco Station development next door have both added high-rise residential buildings to their plans.

The 240-acre Frisco Station is planning for a 20-story “urban living” building at Gaylord and John Hickman parkways.

The proposed high-rise would be part of a retail, restaurant, hotel and entertainment complex that Frisco Station developers are calling The Hub.

“We have had a lot of interest in this type of product so we are trying to keep all of our options open,” said Trey Sibley, general manager of The Rudman Partnership, one of the partners in Frisco Station.

Frisco Station developer Hillwood recently broke ground on a 4-story 300-unit apartment community called the Station House. The rental community just west of the Dallas North Tollway will be the first of almost 2,400 apartments planned in Frisco Station.

Frisco Station is also constructing a 7-story office building which will open this year. And work just started on two hotels with 300 rooms.

Next door at The Star, developers have filed new plans with the city for a residential building with a “minimum 17 stories.”

A spokesman for The Star said Monday they couldn’t comment at this time on the proposed residential high-rise.

Along with the Dallas Cowboys football team’s headquarters and practice facility, the $1.5 billion Star project includes the 12,000-seat Ford Center athletic and event venue, a multi-tenant office building, a high-rise Omni Hotel, sports medical center, shops and restaurants.

Currently there are almost a dozen high-rise residential buildings either under construction or announced in the Dallas area. Most of the projects are located in Dallas’ Uptown, downtown or other close-in neighborhoods.

“Places like Plano and Frisco, with already established job bases plus retail and entertainment districts, are locations where the introduction of comparatively dense housing development now makes sense,” said Greg Willett, an apartment industry analysts with Richardson-based RealPage. “High-rise apartments probably won’t become the dominant choice in these markets, but they do make sense as an attractive option for some.”

A residential tower with a minimum of 17 stories is being added to plans for the Dallas Cowboy’s Star in Frisco project.